The modern concept of the Hospital was introduced by Muslims

The modern concept of the hospital was introduced by Muslims.

The medicine of the medieval Islamic civilization was built primarily on Greek medicine, in particular the writings of Hippocrates and Galen. The most significant contribution of the Islamic civilization to medicine was the establishment of the hospital for the treatment of patients and for training of physicians. Hospices for the sick, poor, travelers, and orphans had existed in Byzantium and were the model for the Umayyad caliph Walid’s (reigned 705-715) charitable institution for the care of lepers, the blind, and the inform.

The first hospital however, was built in Baghdad by Harun al-Rashid (reigned 786-809). This was soon followed by several other hospitals all over the Islamic world including the Adudi hospital in Baghdad, which was founded in 982. Another great hospital, the Nasiri hospital of Cairo, was completed in 1284. It had separate wards for fever, opthalmia, surgical cases, and dysentery, and also housed a pharmacy, a mosque, and a library. It had a large administrative staff, lecture halls and attendants of both genders.

Source: A.Nanji, “Muslim Philosophy and the Sciences,”

http://www.iis.ac.uk/view_article.asp?ContentID=106391

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